Wednesday , June 16 2021

NROL-71 is beginning to expand ULA's 2019



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LOMPOC, Calif. – United Launch Alliance (ULA) has a successful departure from its first flight of 2019. The current launch has used the biggest rocket in the & # 39; a Colorado-based company to send a classified use in any space. In doing so, the company could eventually move on to a saga of delay.

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United Launch Alliance has its first flight from 2019 with the start of the classic NROL-71 mission performed on Saturday, January. 19. Archive Photo Credit: Mike Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

United Launch Alliance has the first flight of 2019 with the start of the classic NROL-71 mission on Saturday, January. 19. File Photo Credit: Mike Howard / SpaceFlight Insider

LOMPOC, Calif. – United Launch Alliance (ULA) Successfully completed its first flight from 2019. The current launch has used the biggest rocket in the & # 39; a Colorado-based company to send a classic cargo into space. In doing so, the company could eventually move on to a saga of delay.

ULA's Delta IV Heavy rocket was selected to send the classified NROL-71 company to the Space Launch Complex 6 of Vandenberg Air Force Base (SLC-6) at 11:10 am PST (2:10 am EST ), Jan. 19, 2019. The flight was able to run five minutes earlier, but was doubled to make the team complete final items before entering a terminal number. This small adjustment marked the last slip for the often lost mission.

NROL-71 was successful on September 26, December 7, 8, 18, 19, 20 and 30 (in 2018). On January 5, 2019, ULA stated that the start date was "under rain".

"We understand that this is a high priority mission for the warfighters of all peoples and we take our commitment to security and safety seriously," said Gary Wentz, vice-president of government and commercial programs & # 39; ULA Issued.

In United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket runs at Vandenberg's SLC-6 with the user drawer NROL-71 for the National Reconnaissance Office. Photo's Credit: Hunter Kilpatrick / SpaceFlight Insider

In United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket runs at Vandenberg's SLC-6 with the user drawer NROL-71 for the National Reconnaissance Office. Photo's Credit: Hunter Kilpatrick / SpaceFlight Insider

NROL-71 was the 28th ULA flight for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and the 38th start of a Delta IV rocket (current flight marked but the 11th use of a missile in a "Heavy" configuration). The Delta IV only started on November 20, 2002 at a height.

The NGO is the UG government representation in the direction of designing, building, drafting and maintaining & # 39; an American fleet of intelligence satellites. In 1961, the existence of the NRO became a secret secret.

Until 1973, the very existence of the NGO was not public knowledge (and even then the accident was discovered). It was discovered in September 1992. Now the NGO is their own Facebook page. NROL-71 is the 52nd well-known bureaucracy released since 1996.

Mission logo for NROL-71. Image Credit: United Launch Alliance

Mission logo for NROL-71. Image Credit: United Launch Alliance

By the classified nature of NROL-71, much is known about what has actually been launched, but it is believed that an electro-optical explanation becomes a satellite operating from an elliptical polar orbit of about 160 by 620 kilometers (260 to 1,000 kilometers) .

The NROL-71 mission marked the first flight of the 233-fifty (71-meter) Heavy variant of the Vandenberg Delta IV rocket in more than five years. The aircraft is made up of three Common Booster Cores (CBCs), a 16 foot (5 meter) square weightless and a Delta Cryogenic Second Stage. Each of CBC's is powered by RS-68A, made by Aerojet Rocketdyne. The second phase of & # 39; e rocket is responded by RL-10 engine.

Each RS-68A bike delivered 702,000 pounds of power in a while in the first phase of & # 39; a flight. After sending a RL10B-2 got a few 24,750 pounds of power to send the top stage of Delta IV Heavy with the load in & lt; RTI ID = 0.0 & gt;

An old enemy showed that the head was short before the opening of the current start window – high wind. Reported as ULA's director and president Tory Bruno tweets prior to cancellation: & # 39; The wind goes up. Everyone thinks early. "

When things improve, Bruno appears optimistic – what it later pay in the day: "Board is green, wine is high, but better."

At 90 seconds before a start of a ULA comment explaining that the launch team waited a long time: all the core numbers were ready to support the flight. Once lost the 90 seconds, flames flicker from & # 39; a rocket, which is the beginning of a flight.

In the past, the ridge was removed from the paddle, it began a faint vertical rise before moving on a southern path across the Pacific Ocean. It reached Mach 1 – the speed of sound – so a minuely-and-a-half after lifting.

At this point in the mission, the Delta IV Heavy was burning a 5,000 pound (2,268 kilo) of fuel per second.

Four minutes, 10 seconds after they fled, the two side-built CBC's burned their fuel and dropped off. After nearly two minutes later, the central kernel parted from the mission and separated from & # 39; An upper stage, which made its so-called 5-minute bike, 55 seconds after starting a fire that was locked to unlock 12 minutes and six seconds.

For this to be a classified mission, the ULA coverage from & # 39; s launch was terminated for useful divorce protection, which appeared 6 minutes, 6 seconds after leaving the path.

ULA's following flight range is a start of another Delta IV, this one in its Medium + (5.4) configuration. The used cargo will be the 10th Wideband Global SATCOM game for the US Air Force. Currently, this mission is scheduled for March 13, 2019, from the Space Launch Complex 37B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Tagged with: Delta IV Heavy Defense Department Lead Stories NROL 71 Space Launch Complex 6 United Launch Alliance United States Air Force Vandenberg Air Force Base

Patrick Attwell

Patrick Attwell is a Houston, Texas memorandum, but now lives in Austin, Texas where he studies at Concordia University Texas. Atwell has a passion for all things that are connected to aerospace, rockjet and aviation. Atwell has worked to cover these fields for over a year. After he visited and included NASA's OSMIS-REx mission, he gave him something known in & # 39; a space as a rocket feeder. Since then, Atwell has been following its dreams and has been hosting events to sell NASA's Flight Assignments NASA's Johnson Space Center and other space-changing events in the Lone Star State.


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