Thursday , December 9 2021

Motor neuron patients and supporters may be affected by D & # 39; Feet Disease



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Patients and supporters of motor neurone disease walked the square at Palmerston Northfire Station to support people with diseases.

Murray Winson / Stuff

Patients and supporters of motor neurone disease walked the square at Palmerston Northfire Station to support people with diseases.

A short walk can feel like a marathon for people suffering from motor neurological disorders, so people show their support in the street.

Walk 2 D & # 39; Feet motor neuron disease was held on Sunday, a day of awareness of fatal muscle wasting disease that deprives people of exercise and language.

Sponsors and patients of the disease walked from the Palmerston North Fire Station to the square and raised funds for fundraising and research for treatment.

Many people dressed in blue clothes walked around the square and ran the fire truck.

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Kylie Martin (31), from Palmerston North, was diagnosed about 10 years ago and began to deteriorate about five years ago.

She said her family, father, grandfather, uncle and aunt, all died of motor neuron disease.

"I am definitely worried about the next generation," said Martin, your child.

She said she could not stand for a long time and was easily exhausted.

"Especially when I try to run a house with my kids, they are extremely run down."

Marilyn Merriman, 70, of Panmerston North, learned that she had a motor neurological disorder a year ago.

She needs a walking frame to get around, but her husband, Ross, was pushing her into a wheelchair for Sunday walks.

On Sunday, people walked in Walker D (Feet motor neurone disease).

Murray Winson / Stuff

On Sunday, people walked in Walker D (Feet motor neurone disease).

"I just stopped breathing," Merriman said. "We used to walk for an hour, but now we can not."

She said it would be nice to meet other people with the same problem.

More than 3,000 people in New Zealand suffer from motor neuropathy and more than 100 people die each year.

"Every year when more people are diagnosed in New Zealand, we can reach that effect and provide the best support for people living with motor neuron disease and their families," said Carl Sunderland, general manager of motor neuron disease. I want to be there. "

Half of the money raised in the whole country was to support people with this disease, and the other half went to study cures.

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