Tuesday , January 18 2022

A sickly woman who depends on donations to extend her life by the end of the month



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Beach Haven Women Vanessa Crowson tries to prolong her life by fighting adenocarcinoma before receiving immunotherapy.

Rebecca Moore / Things

Beach Haven Women Vanessa Crowson tries to prolong her life by fighting adenocarcinoma before receiving immunotherapy.

The Auckland woman with a rare illness feels she "took" two years of life, and begins a new treatment with the last hope to recover for several months.

Vanessa Crowson talks about how she does not want to leave her family before Christmas as she tears.

A wife, four mothers, and a prominent woman in Beach Haven's North Shore community are fighting for adrenal cancer to fight for more lives and need public funds.

A rare form of cancer came from Cushing 's Disease, which was diagnosed in February.

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In Crowson's case, Cushing's Disease occurs when prolonged exposure to high cortisol levels occurs and after a long period of time after being mistaken for epilepsy, it develops into an aggressive cancer.

Together with her friends Debbie McGee and Rachael Trotman, Vanessa Crowson (Center) was given immunotherapy to extend her life.

Rebecca Moore / Things

Together with her friends Debbie McGee and Rachael Trotman, Vanessa Crowson (Center) was given immunotherapy to extend her life.

Crowson later said her cancer was the end. "It's really terrible, it got up pretty quickly," she said.

She underwent surgery in May to remove multiple tumors. She received chemotherapy and radiation therapy, but the cancer grew.

On Wednesday, Vanessa started the immunotherapy treatment, which the government does not fund and costs $ 7800 per treatment.

Three weeks after each treatment there is the next treatment. Crowson wants four treatments in total.

If the treatment is successful, you can live 3 to 1 year more.

"This is the only chance I can have," she said.

Lisa Williams, Pharmac director, said that atezolizumab, a drug launched by Crowson, is currently an untreated immunotherapy treatment in New Zealand.

Pharmac has received two funding applications for atezolizumab and is now considering various funding applications for other immunotherapy treatments, including pembrolizumab and nivolumab, for different types of cancer treatment, Williams said.

Pembrolizumab and Nivolumab have been funded to treat melanoma that has developed since 2016 and must meet certain clinical criteria.

The Givealittle page for Crowson has been set aside to cover her treatment and related costs.

Crowson's friends believed that contributing to the community was worth the contribution.

She lived in Auckland's North Shore for 22 years before moving to Beach Haven, including living in Birkdale, Torbay and Albany.

Three years ago she operated a gelato shop in Beach Haven, a "community hub" that attracted school children, seniors and business meetings.

She has been in business for three years and became famous in the community at that time.

"I miss it and work. I was sick when I was sick."

On Wednesday, the Givealittle page raised over $ 7,800 for the first treatment.

"It's bizarre, it's overwhelming, and it's incredibly humble how many people donate," she said.

"I have such a support group, but it's terrible to think I have a few months left."

She has her husband Stu and four sons, Zakery of 19, Jordan of 21, Blake of 26, and Karl of 29.

"The children are now adults, but not enough to say goodbye."

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