Friday , July 23 2021

COVID-19 myths that refuse to die, from excessive worries about children to variants and vaccines



The pandemic was never a danger to children

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If you are reading this in Canada, you are living in one of the most intimate countries on earth when it comes to COVID-19. Over the weekend, the rate of fully vaccinated Canadians against COVID-19 officially crossed the US

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The effects have been dramatic. On Saturday, only three Canadians died of the disease, and COVID-19 hospital districts across the country became empty. Through every available metric, Canada has successfully vaccinated from the pandemic and is now one of the safest places on earth for COVID-19.

Despite this, we continue to adhere to some of the most stringent safeguard measures in the Western world, while public opinion COVID-19 poses far greater danger than it currently deserves. Below is a list of some of the most widespread myths that still cling to the novel coronavirus, such as the science of why they are wrong.

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COVID-19 is dangerous for children

Only 25 children in the UK died from COVID-19 complications in the first year of the pandemic.

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The same period, from March 2020 to February 2021, saw 97,000 total British COVID-19 deaths, including the deaths of 3,105 children from all causes, including cancer, drownings and car crashes. This month, a National Health Service study concluded that every child under 18 who adopts COVID-19 in the UK had a 99.995 percent chance of surviving.

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And the UK infant mortality rate is high by global standards. Only 397 children 18 years of age and younger in the U.S. died from COVID-19, against more than 49,000 U.S. children who died of other causes (and more than 598,000 U.S. COVID-19 killed in total). In Canada, deaths under 18 are 14, roughly 0.1 percent of the country’s total COVID-19 death toll. Since the pandemic began, at least five times that number of Canadian children have died from drowning.

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What’s more, the inherent immunity of children to COVID-19 has been widely known since the first North American COVID-19 cases began to affect Washington State. As early as February 2020, it was clear from data from early cases from Wuhan, China that the risk of the disease for children was roughly equal to the flu.

These figures are an indictment of many child-centered lock-in policies, such as school closures. The extremely low risk of COVID-19 for children is why many epidemiologists now warn against universal vaccination of adolescents, given recent accounts of the Pfizer vaccine linked to childhood encephalitis.

While the side effect is extremely rare, the benefits that a COVID-19 vaccine offers to adolescents are so vanishingly small that it may not even be worth a small risk of vaccine injury. This is why the UK does not recommend jabs for most children under 18, while countries such as Germany and the Netherlands only recommend vaccines for children with pre-existing conditions. As the British Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization said in a statement on 15 July, “the health benefits to this population are small, and the benefits to the wider population are very uncertain.”

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Masking and self-isolation is necessary after complete vaccination

Of the 159 million Americans who have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine since January, only 1,063 of them have since died from a “vaccine breakthrough” case of the disease.

For context, seeing current U.S. mortality rates, saw in the same period that cohort of 159 million people likely 142,000 deaths from heart disease, 10,000 deaths from suicide and 11,000 deaths from flu or pneumonia.

In recent weeks, virtually all U.S. deaths from COVID-19 have occurred among adults who have not been vaccinated.

A recent UK study followed frontline employees four months accurately, testing them weekly to track who is adopting COVID-19. Of the 3,975 workers checked, only five were infected with COVID-19 despite being vaccinated – and all five made a full recovery.

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Public Health Ontario, meanwhile, found last week that only 0.02 percent of fully vaccinated Ontarians are infected by a “vaccine breakthrough” case of COVID-19. And given the province’s declining rate of COVID-19 deaths (three days this week saw zero deaths), it’s safe to say that almost all of those breakthrough cases are back at work.

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In short, we have known for several months that if you are two weeks past your second dose of vaccine, your risk of dying from COVID-19 is about the same as dying from flu or tuberculosis. Despite this, public health authorities across Canada have stubbornly continued to mask as necessary self-isolation, regardless of vaccination status.

The US-based Centers for Disease Control are similarly prone to excessive public health orders (only in May did they stop recommending social segregation for the fully vaccinated), but last month CDC Director Rochelle Walensky made the full vaccination no more sense was to wear masks.

The variants are more deadly and resistant to vaccines

Despite initial fears that vaccines would be useless against the Delta variant, which was first identified in India, data from June from Public Health England found the opposite, In some cases, vaccines were better equipped to repel the Delta variant than against the former Alpha strain, which was first identified in the United Kingdom but has been overtaken by Delta. For example, two doses of AstraZeneca were 92 percent effective in preventing hospitalization of Delta variant infection – compared with 86 percent effective against the Alpha variant. More recent data have even higher protection levels.

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Just this month, however, Canadian data emerged to show that complete vaccination was as effective against the Delta variant as against any previous strain of COVID-19. Even a single dose of vaccine was shown to be “good for providing excellent protection against symptomatic infection and severe outcomes caused by the 4 currently circulating variants of care,” reads a preprint paper from the University of Toronto.

New strains such as the Delta variant are more difficult for the simple fact that they are more contagious, and thus better able to pick up new infections. Earlier this year, despite a wave of reports that COVID-19 variants were more dangerous to young people, research soon showed that while more people adopt the variants, they are less likely to die or require hospitalization once they are infected. In the words of an April study in The Lancet that assessed the severity of the Alpha variant, “we have not identified an association of the variant with severe disease.”

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