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He found a rock, thought it had gold, but it was a 4600-year-old meteorite




Through the cut of the meteoryt, in its interior, small droplets could look like silver rain that is the remnants of minerals Credit: Melbourne Museum

In 2015, Dave Hole found a large reddish rock that he was looking for in gold near Maryborough, the Australian city where he lives. He was noticed that this stone was much heavier than it seems and that is why he thought there was a need for the precious metal to obscure him. Then he tried to break the stone found.

He tried to open it with a rock saw. Do it, with a hammer, and he couldn't. He eventually lifted it over his head and struck it in the ground, but the rock didn't get scratched. Hole thought: "What is this thing I found?"

But Hole was wrong. The reddish rock that he found in close proximity to his city, about 140 kilometers from & # 39; Melbourne's city had nothing to do with gold. It was an element of the outside world, with a period of over 4,600 million years, according to the Australian media
The Sydney Morning Herald.

Thus, Henry and Bill Birch are geologists and work at the Melbourne Museum. Part of its task is to deceive people who're coming there with different types of rocks that are waiting for them to be meteorites. Of the thousands of minerals that Henry had studied in his museum for 37 years, they were only two.


The Melbourne Museum's geologists were keen to discover that a meteorite arrived at their workplace
The Melbourne Museum's geologists were keen to discover that a meteorite arrived at their workplace Credit: The Sydney Morning Herald

But at the right moment, when Mr. Hole arrived with his rock wrapped in the backpack, she began to wake up. The material that the golden digger had brought "saw imagery and dimpled," as Henry described, and explained: "This is formed as meteorites pass through the atmosphere, because they melt outside and the atmosphere becomes static".

His colleague, the geological doctor Birch knew that it was an object the space was then picked up. "If someone saw such a rock on the ground and picked it up, it shouldn't be so heavy."

Laboratory tests quickly confirm the benefits of the specialists. The rock of Mr. Hole was a 4.6 billion year old meteorite.

Meteorite characteristics

The rock, now known as the Maryborough meteoryt because of the location it was found, is very heavy, because it is full of dense forms of iron and nickel, something it distinguishes from standard rocks. from & # 39; earth.

Henry used an ultra-hard diamond saw to cut one end of the object, which is about 39 centimeters long and 14 inches high and wide, and ventures – much for those measurements – about 17 kilos. The cutbacks reveal small silver-like rain drops, which are remnants of silicate minerals that crystallized in "superheated gas clouds" which were billions of years ago our solar system.


The object came from & # 39; s interior space and has an enormous weight for a stone of that size
The object came from & # 39; s interior space and has an enormous weight for a stone of that size Credit: Melbourne Museum

This type of stone found by Hole is called chondrites, and they are equal to the rocks that form the earth in the beginning. 4,600 million years ago when our solar system made out of clogs of this condrita that surrounded the sun. Gravity grouped these rocks to form the earth and the other rocky planets.

Some condrite lumps ran around the solar system, most of them doing so in an asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

Sometimes two asteroids collide with this belt, throwing rock carvings out of their orbit. This is how the Maryborough meteorite would have started its journey, as a fragment instructed to fly to Earth.

Rock analyzes suggest he was less than 200 years old on earth, explains Henry. This means that someone has probably seen it. There are records in the local crawl bars that crawl over Maryborough.

The meteorite found by the golden digger will be exhibited on August 11 at the Melbourne Museum during National Science Week. Mr. Hole plans to attend to see his rock again, traveling for 4.6 billion years to end up in his village.


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